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The Tasman Glacier


The Tasman Glacier

The longest temperate glacier in the Southern Hemisphere

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The Tasman Glacier


The Tasman Glacier

The longest temperate glacier in the Southern Hemisphere

The South Island of New Zealand is unique for a temperate climate zone in that the glaciers here come almost to sea level. 

There are approximately 178 separate glaciers in Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park. The two main systems are the Tasman and the Godley.

Two million years of history

The Tasman Glacier's story goes back 2 million years - to the Pleistocene ice ages. The glacier has advanced and retreated several times, leaving behind great moraine deposits, and carving out Lake Pukaki.

    Glacier Statistics

  • 23 km long
  • 600 metres deep (nearly 2000 ft) in the middle, and 200 metres deep at the nevé
  • An average width of 1.6 km (a mile)
  • Average daily surface motion 35-40 cm (over a foot)
  • Annual snowfall depth at the nevé - up to 70 metres!

CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE TASMAN GLACIER

Over recent years the affects of climate change on the Tasman Glacier are evident. The growing terminal lake, and increasing amounts of moraine on the lower glacier are the most obvious signs.

Scientists from GNS New Zealand have been surveying the Tasman, and the local mountains and other glaciers. Read about their work on the GNS website.


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Run Map


Glacier Run Map

Explore the dramatic landscape on two 8 to 10 km runs.

Run Map


Glacier Run Map

Explore the dramatic landscape on two 8 to 10 km runs.

Tasman Glacier Run Map

Every fine day we ski 2 runs on the glacier - taking a different line and starting from a different landing spot for each run.

The average run length is about 8 km - and up to 10 km in some seasons. 

  • Highest landing: Tasman Saddle 2,500 metres
  • Lowest aircraft pick up: Malte Brun strip 1,500 metres

The Google Map shows the Tasman Glacier in early summer. Through the winter there is much more snow cover, with most "holes" filled in.